Events

Thursday, January 8, 2015 – 7:00pm
Dennos Museum Center
Community Cinema: A Path Appears
Free film and discussion

A Path Appears investigates young women in America forced into a life of prostitution and the innovative programs that have evolved to achieve remarkable results in empowering their lives. Sex trafficking and prostitution. Domestic slavery. Teen pregnancy. The devastation of poverty. These troubling situations are happening not just halfway across the world, but also in our own backyards — in Chicago and Nashville and Boston.

From the creative team that brought you the groundbreaking Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide, the full four-hour series A Path Appears will air on PBS as a special presentation of Independent Lens in early 2015 as part of the Women and Girls Lead initiative.

Monday, January 19, 2015 – 10:00am-5:00pm
Great Lakes Children’s Museum
Peace Day 2015! Celebrate our Differences
Admission: $6/person ages 3+

Come to the Great Lakes Children’s Museum on Martin Luther King Day to explore and celebrate Peace. Hands-on peace and cultural diversity exploration stations will be set up in the Great Lakes Activity Room from 11:00 am to 3:00 pm. There will be special story times at 11:00 am, Noon, 1:00 pm and 2:00 pm featuring the books “My Brother Martin” by Christine King-Farris, and “The Skin You Live In”, by Michael Tyler.

Activities will include: Learning stations from 3 different cultures; Wear a new face! (Exploring what it would be like to look like someone else); Peace Words: (Learning the word for Peace in many different languages); “I Have a Dream” Imagination Station

Monday, January 19, 2015 – 11:00am-3:00pm
Traverse Area District Library, Main Branch
Martin Luther King, Jr Day Drop-in Craft
Free

Stop by the Youth Services Room to create & share what your dream is on your very own “Dream Cloud” to be displayed throughout February.

Monday, January 19, 2015 – 9:00am
The State Theatre
Martin Luther King, Jr. Remembrance Day Celebration
To Kill a Mockingbird

Harper Lee’s Pulitzer Prize–winning novel about a single father lawyer who defends a falsely accused black man was made into one of America’s best films in 1962, the year before Dr. King led the March on Washington. Many families make an annual trek to the State to watch Gregory Peck steer his children through an eventful summer in their small hometown, as they are exposed to prejudice and evil, courage and compassion. Not Rated, 129 minutes.

Monday, January 19, 2015 – 5:30pm
The State Theatre
Martin Luther King, Jr. Remembrance Day Celebration
Live in Concert: Motown Legends Gospel Choir
Free, ticketed event

Building Bridges with Music, the Traverse City Human Rights Commission, and the State Theatre present live in concert the renowned Motown Legends Gospel Choir, with the NMCCC Cantus Choir. Sponsored by Golden Fowler Home Furnishings, Traverse City State Bank, the City of Traverse City and the State Theatre.

Motown Legends Gospel Choir is one of the preeminent gospel choirs in the Midwest. The Choir consists of many past and present Motown artists, including members of the famed Contours (“Do You Love Me”) and the Vandella’s (“Dancing in the Street”). Director and founder Albert Chisholm, of the Contours, created this amazing ensemble of angelic voices to touch the hearts and spirits of people across the world.

For their appearance at the 2015 MLK event, the Motown Legends Gospel Choir will present an evening of gospel, civil rights era music and Motown favorites. The event opens with a mayoral proclamation, an invocation by area clergy, and a performance by the Northwestern Michigan College Children’s Choir Cantus ensemble under the direction of Jeffrey Cobb.

Wednesday, February 4, 2015 – 10:30am
The State Theatre
25-cent Matinee
Imitation of Life

The lives of a widow and her housekeeper are united first in mutual need, then success and ultimately, in heartache in this Academy Award®-nominated Best Picture. Claudette Colbert and Louise Beavers are superb as Bea and Delilah, two women with young daughters who build a life and a fortune together selling Delilah’s pancake recipe. But success doesn’t save them from sorrow with the passing years. Delilah’s light-skinned teenager rejects her mother and her race, while Bea must choose between the man she loves and the daughter who loves him, too. Now all of them will pay the price of love in this spellbinding classic, revered as one of the all-time Hollywood tear-jerkers, from collaborators William Hurlbut and Preston Sturges.

Wednesday, February 11, 2015 – 10:30am
The State Theatre
25-cent Matinee
Ghosts of Mississippi

In this film based on actual events, black activist Medgar Evers (James Pickens Jr.) is murdered in 1963, and much of the evidence points toward white supremacist Byron De La Beckwith (James Woods). However, after two trials, De La Beckwith is acquitted twice by a jury of whites. Now, decades later in 1989, Evers’ widow, Myrlie (Whoopi Goldberg), thinks she has evidence to finally convict him. But no lawyer will touch the case except the young and brash Bobby DeLaughter (Alec Baldwin).

Wednesday, February 11, 2015 – 7:00pm
Dennos Museum Center, Milliken Auditorium
“Slamming Stereotypes” with Kinetic Affect
Free Admission

Two very different men, Kirk Latimer and Gabriel Giron of Kalamazoo, MI, combine their voices as Kinetic Affect, to give life to their difficult histories through the expressive medium of spoken word poetry. Utilizing the lessons they have learned from surviving past traumatic experiences, Kinetic Affect will challenge students, educators and the community to break out of the ethnic, socio-economic, gender and racial stereotypes that burden so many lives. Please join for this unique event of creative expression with one of the truest forms of social advocacy. This event is sponsored by NMC’s Office of Student Life and Traverse City High School.

Thursday, February 12, 2015 – 7:00pm
Dennos Museum Center
Community Cinema: American Denial
Free film and discussion

Follow the story of foreign researcher and Nobel Laureate Gunnar Myrdal whose study, An American Dilemma (1944), provided a provocative inquiry into the dissonance between stated beliefs as a society and what is perpetuated and allowed in the name of those beliefs. His inquiry into the United States’ racial psyche becomes a lens for modern inquiry into how denial, cognitive dissonance, and unrecognized, unconscious attitudes continue to dominate racial dynamics in American life. The film’s unusual narrative sheds a unique light on the unconscious political and moral world of modern Americans. Archival footage, newsreels, nightly news reports, and rare southern home movies from the ’30s and ’40s thread through the story, as well as psychological testing into racial attitudes from research footage, websites, and YouTube films.

Hear from experts — historians, psychologists, sociologists and Myrdal’s daughters — all filmed directly to camera. Witnesses work to exhume unconscious feelings Americans have about themselves and others — fascinated by the Myrdal question, and by how much true thinking and feeling unfolds in social contexts in an unconscious mode. What are the implications for individual responsibility and social justice in democracies like America’s?

Monday, February 16, 2015 – 11:00am
Traverse Area District Library, Main Branch
African American Tales with Brenda Harris
Free

Journey through African American History with professional storyteller Brenda Harris. Families and school groups welcome. Space is limited, so groups of more than 10 please call to register; 231-932-8503.

Wednesday, February 18, 2015 – 10:30am
The State Theatre
25-cent Matinee
Driving Miss Daisy

Based on the Pulitzer Prize-winning play by Alfred Uhry, Driving Miss Daisy affectionately covers the 25-year relationship between a wealthy, strong-willed Southern matron (Jessica Tandy) and her equally indomitable Black chauffeur, Hoke (Morgan Freeman). Both employer and employee are outsiders, Hoke because of the color of his skin, Miss Daisy because she is Jewish in a WASP-dominated society. At the same time, Hoke cannot fathom Miss Daisy’s cloistered inability to grasp the social changes that are sweeping the South in the 1960s. Nor can Miss Daisy understand why Hoke’s “people” are so indignant. It is only when Hoke is retired and Miss Daisy is confined to a home for the elderly that the two fully realize that they’ve been friends and kindred spirits all along. Driving Miss Daisy won Academy Awards for Best Picture, Best Actress (Jessica Tandy), Best Screenplay (Uhry), and Best Makeup (Manlio Rochetti).

Wednesday, February 25, 2015 – 10:30am
The State Theatre
25-cent Matinee
Mississippi Burning

Starring two-time Oscar winner Gene Hackman and Academy Award nominee Willem Dafoe, Mississippi Burning ranks as one of the most potent and insightful views of racial turmoil yet produced. Nominated for six Oscars and winner of an Academy Award for Best Cinematography, this emotionally charged film vividly captures a crucial chapter in American history. As three civil rights activists drive down a desolate stretch of highway, headlights ominously draw near. Telling each other to stay calm, they have no way of knowing that in minutes they will disappear into the night and spark one of the most explosive murder investigations in history. Enter straight-laced Ward (Dafoe) and deceptively easy-going Anderson (Hackman). Can these two philosophically opposed FBI agents overcome their differences and uncover the chilling mystery of a small Ku Klux Klan-ridden community before an entire town is torn apart by racism?

Saturday, February 28th, 2015 – 10:00am – 4:00pm
Dennos Museum Center
Homes Filled with Hearts
Free admission to the event

Habitat for Humanity, GTR presents an exhibit featuring artwork from Habitat families, and a tool craft project 1-3 pm.

Thursday, March 12, 2015 – 7:00pm
Dennos Museum Center
Community Cinema: The Homestretch
Free film and discussion

The Homestretch follows three homeless teens as they fight to stay in school, graduate, and build a future. Each of these smart, ambitious youths — Roque, Kasey, and Anthony — will surprise, inspire, and challenge audiences to rethink stereotypes of homelessness as they work to complete their education while facing the trauma of being alone and abandoned at an early age. While told through a personal perspective, their stories connect with larger issues of poverty, race, juvenile justice, immigration, foster care, and LGBTQ rights.

With unprecedented access into Chicago public schools, The Night Ministry “Crib” emergency youth shelter, and Teen Living Programs’ Belfort House, The Homestretch follows these kids as they move through the milestones of high school while navigating a landscape of couch hopping, emergency shelters, transitional homes, street families, and a school system on the front lines of the homelessness crisis. The Homestretch examines the struggles these youth face in obtaining a high school level education, and then follows them beyond graduation to focus on the crucial transition when the structure of school vanishes, and homeless youth often struggle to find the support and community they need to survive and be independent. A powerful, original perspective on what it means to be young and homeless in America today, while building a future.

Saturday, March 28th, 2015 – 10:00am – 4:00pm
Dennos Museum Center
Upscale Art
Free Admission to the event

Habitat for Humanity, GTR presents a salvage art exhibit and silent auction featuring ReStore wooden chairs that have been re-imagined and restored. Concept: Take a chair and bring it to life!

Saturday, April 18th, 2015 – 10:00am – 4:00pm
Dennos Museum Center
Net Zero Housing Presentation
Free Admission to the event

Habitat for Humanity, GTR presents an exhibit on energy use with a special guest speaker on reusable energy, net zero housing, and the benefits of recycling.