Events

Monday, January 11 | 6:30 pm
Books to Movie Night – Ray
Traverse Area District Library Woodmere Branch
Please join us in celebrating the history of African Americans as we watch movies that depict different stages of American History.
FREE

Thursday, January 14 | 7pm
In Football We Trust by Tony Vainuku and Erika Cohn
Dennos Museum Center
This film intimately follows four Polynesian high school football players in Utah struggling to overcome gang violence, family pressures, and poverty as they enter the high stakes world of college recruiting and the promise of pro sports. The odds may be stacked against them, but they’ll never stop fighting for a better future.
FREE

Monday, January 18 | 9 am
To Kill a Mockingbird
The State Theatre
Each year, we honor Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. on his holiday with a free screening of this timeless American classic. Based on the Pulitzer Prize–winning novel by Harper Lee, it follows young siblings Scout and Jem on their daring adventures through the sleepy Alabama town of Maycomb in the 1930s. Gregory Peck provides an Academy Award–winning performance as the children’s widowed father Atticus Finch, a role Lee noted gave Peck the “opportunity to play himself.” Much to the dismay of Maycomb’s community, Atticus agrees to defend a black man named Tom Robinson, who has been wrongfully accused of a terrible crime. As a result of their father’s brave and just decision, the children are exposed to the prejudice and evil as well as the courage and compassion prevalent in their hometown.
FREE

Monday, January 18 | 10 am
Drop-In Craft: Martin Luther King, Jr. Day
Traverse Area District Library Woodmere Branch
Stop in on MLK Day to create a Peace Flower of your own to gift to a friend or family member.
FREE

Monday, January 18 | 12:30 pm
42
The State Theatre
Hero is a word we hear often in sports, but heroism is not always about achievements on the field of play. “42″ tells the story of two men-the great Jackie Robinson and legendary Brooklyn Dodgers GM Branch Rickey-whose brave stand against prejudice forever changed the world by changing the game of baseball. In 1946, Branch Rickey (Harrison Ford) put himself at the forefront of history when he signed Jackie Robinson (Chadwick Boseman) to the team, breaking Major League Baseball’s infamous color line. But the deal also put both Robinson and Rickey in the firing line of the public, the press and even other players. Facing unabashed racism from every side, Robinson was forced to demonstrate tremendous courage and restraint by not reacting in kind, knowing that any incident could destroy his and Rickey’s hopes. Instead, Number 42 let his talent on the field do the talking-ultimately winning over fans and his teammates, silencing his critics, and paving the way for others to follow.
FREE

Monday, January 18 | 11 am – 3 pm
Peace Day
The Great Lakes Children’s Museum
Come the Great Lakes Children’s Museum on Martin Luther King Day to explore and celebrate Peace. Hands on peace activity stations will be set up in the Great Lakes Room from 11:00-3:00. There will be special story times at 11:00, 12:00, 1:00 and 2:00 , featuring the book “My Brother Martin”, by Christine King, Farris, and “It’s O.K. To Be Different”, by Todd Parr.

Monday, January 18 | 6 pm
Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration: Blues, Gospel, Motown & Hip Hop – Civil Rights in Music & Dance
The State Theatre
Detroit’s most exceptional and accomplished dancers and the TC Sings Community Choir directed by Heather Kingham will perform live. Sponsored by Building Bridges with Music, the TC Human Rights Commission and the State Theatre, this year’s event showcases young tap, modern and hip hop dancers with nationally acclaimed pianist Michael Jellick and former NMC international student Gevas Moyo in a compelling and unique look at the civil rights movement through music, dance and the spoken word. Building Bridges founder Jeff Haas is the artistic director the MLK event. “These incredibly gifted young dancers and musicians have put together a program that embodies Dr. King’s message of equal rights for all people,” explains Haas. “The young artists who are making the journey to Traverse City for this important holiday will turn the spotlight on the common thread that connects the blues, gospel, Motown and hip hop and use it to celebrate the teachings and humanity of Martin Luther King, Jr.”
FREE – Ticketed Event

Monday, January 18 | 6:30 pm
Books to Movie Night – Talk to Me
Traverse Area District Library Woodmere Branch
Please join us in celebrating the history of African Americans as we watch movies that depict different stages of American History.
FREE

Monday, January 18 | 8:30 pm
Selma
The State Theatre
“Selma” is the story of a movement. The film chronicles the tumultuous three-month period in 1965, when Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. led a dangerous campaign to secure equal voting rights in the face of violent opposition. The epic march from Selma to Montgomery culminated in President Johnson (Tom Wilkinson) signing the Voting Rights Act of 1965, one of the most significant victories for the civil rights movement. Director Ava DuVernay’s “Selma” tells the real story of how the revered leader and visionary Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. (David Oyelowo) and his brothers and sisters in the movement prompted change that forever altered history.
FREE

Friday, January 22 | 7 pm
What’s Real by Sampson McCormick
Dennos Museum Center - Milliken Auditorium
Sampson McCormick is a nationally touring, award winning stand-up comedian, writer and activist who makes audiences double over in laughter whether he’s joking about his wacky Aunt Jackie, his twink neighbor, or homophobia, poverty, and religion. For over a decade, he has been a favorite at LGBT pride festivals and mainstream venues alike. Join us for a hilarious stand-up special for a night of riveting, refreshing, and original takes on religion, sexuality, life and politics.
$10 Suggested Donation – No one turned away for lack of funds

Monday, January 25 | 6:30 pm
Books to Movie Night – Remember the Titans
Traverse Area District Library Woodmere Branch
Please join us in celebrating the history of African Americans as we watch movies that depict different stages of American History.
FREE

Wednesday, February 3 | 10:30 am
“Akeelah and the Bee”
Black History Month: The Next Generation
The State Theatre
25¢ Classic Matinee

Wednesday, February 10 | 10:30 am
“The Great Debaters”
Black History Month: The Next Generation
The State Theatre
25¢ Classic Matinee

Wednesday, February 10 | 7:30 pm
“Collaborative Intelligence” Lecture by Angie McArthur
Dennos Museum Center 
Angie McArthur, a featured speaker at Traverse City TEDx 2015 returns to Northwestern Michigan College on the evening of Wednesday, February 10, 2016. Hosted by NMC’s Office of Student Life, Angie will be presenting along with one of her collaborators, Anne Powell, at the Milliken Auditorium on NMC’s main campus. Throughout their talk they will present innovative ideas on the diverse ways people think, and how we can utilize this diversity in both radical and fundamental ways to improve how we learn and work on individual and community levels. Her talk is based on her recent books, “Collaborative Intelligence” and “I Am Smart”. Angie and Anne are excited to bring their expertise on multi-dimensional thinking back to Traverse City. This event is a part of the Embrace the Dream series and is free to the community.
FREE

Thursday, February 11 | 7pm
The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution by Stanley Nelson
Dennos Museum Center
A new revolutionary culture emerged in the turbulent 1960s, and the Black Panther Party was at the vanguard. Weaving together a treasure trove of rare footage with the voices of a diverse group of people who were there, Stanley Nelson tells the vibrant story of a pivotal movement that feels timely all over again.
FREE

Wednesday, February 17 | 10:30 am
“Lean on Me”
Black History Month: The Next Generation
The State Theatre
25¢ Classic Matinee

Wednesday, February 24 |10:30 am
“To Sir with Love”
Black History Month: The Next Generation
The State Theatre
25¢ Classic Matinee

March 20 — May 29
Not Ready to Make Nice: Guerrilla Girls in the Artworld and Beyond
Dennos Museum Center
General Admission: $6/adult; $4/child; Members
NMC students and faculty are FREE

This major presentation of the Guerrilla Girls illuminates and contextualizes the important historical and ongoing work of these highly original, provocative, and influential artists who champion feminism and social change. The Guerrilla Girls have been powerfully and consistently active since first breaking onto the art scene in 1985. Appearing only in gorilla masks and assuming the names of dead women artists, the activist group has remained anonymous for nearly three decades while revealing shocking truths about sexism and prejudice in the art world and beyond. Beginning with their courageous poster campaigns of the 1980s and continuing with large-scale international projects, they brilliantly take on the art establishment in a way that has never been seen before or since. Using “facts, humor and fake fur,” they have exposed the discriminatory collecting and exhibiting practices of the most feared art dealers, curators, and collectors. Expanding their work to include non-visual arts media in the 1990s, they’ve taken on everything from the discrimination of women film directors to the environmental crisis.

Focusing primarily on recent work from the past decade, the exhibition features rarely shown international projects that trace the collective’s artistic and activist influence around the globe. In addition, a selection of iconic work from the 80s and 90s illustrates the formative development of the group’s philosophy and conceptual approach to arts activism. Documentary material including ephemera, behind-the-scenes photos and secret anecdotes reveal the Guerrilla Girls’ process and the events that drive their incisive institutional interventions. Visitors can peruse the artists’ favorite “love letters and hate mail,” and are invited to contribute their own voices to interactive installations. This multimedia, expansive exhibition illustrates that the work of the anonymous, feminist-activist Guerrilla Girls is as vital and revolutionary as ever.